"In FaerieLand there is a place called ‘Sidhe Comhairle’ (pronounced ‘Shee Corla’) and wisdom it bestowed, to habitate alongside nature in the enchanted forest in The Dome.”

Inside The Magical Dome

“By far, the ultimate fort!”

The Kitchen

The Kitchenkitchen

Our full-facility kitchen allows guests to stock up with goodies, and enjoy all the luxuries of home.

The Loft



Climb up to the loft, and there you will find a faerie’s bedroom… or sleeping accommodations for three people.

The Living Area



Enjoy leisurely meals in the dining area, where “cozy” gets its name.



Or curl up with a good book on the couch.


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Bath House And Sauna

Bathe in the luxury of faerie sunlight. Enjoy this full-facility bath house,
with the added attraction of a built-in sauna.


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How The Dome Came To Be


Courtenay Cressy painted ‘The Dome’ as it was when Roisin (pronounced Rosheen) and Phil moved to this property in 1994. It was built in the ’70s (at a time when Lund was a haven for conscientious objectors to the Vietnam war) and it was looking pretty sad. Not knowing what to do with it, they sought advice of neighbours, family and friends.

The advice was mixed:

“It’s part of local history.”
“Naah, pull it down and bulldoze it.”
“It’s spooky.”
“Where’s the treasure buried?”
“Too weird!” …and on and on.

Everyone had a different opinion. Roisin and Phil procrastinated. They hoped, maybe, it could be restored enough to become a funky guesthouse.

A friend, who was also a creative artist/carpenter said, “I’m tired of working on square, architecturally planned buildings. If I’m not too busy in the Spring I’ll come and have a go at it, as long as I don’t have to do anything square!”

So, Spring came and so did Rik Tacoma, the artist/carpenter. He and Phil got to work and the magic began. Rik thoroughly enjoyed himself, lovingly restoring many unique details. He spent six hours putting in a window at a strange angle. He hand-carved window sills, and placed original carvings and glass-work in odd places.

The frame of the old Dome was surprisingly strong. They took out all the rotten boards. Phil found a local man who was salvaging old telephone poles and got a great deal on yellow cedar. A neighbour was putting a road through and offered some fir trees which could be milled and used. Treasures from Phil and Roisin’s old home in Burnaby and stained glass from garage sales became incorporated in the building. An Arbutus tree which had blown down across the road during a winter storm was used for the railings in the loft.

All the right materials showed up at just the right times. The trades-people magically appeared when it was time to do their work.


Every time it seemed like the work would come to a standstill because of lack of material and/or funds, whatever was needed magically materialized. Hence the name “Sidhe Comhairle,” pronounced ‘Shee Corla,’ which is Irish Gaelic and means “Faerie Wysdom.” Phil and Roisin believed the good faeries had an interest in seeing the old Dome restored.

Both Phil and Roisin come from Ireland originally, where ‘Faerie Circles’ are a common occurance in farmer’s fields. They believe the circular shape of ‘The Dome,’ the natural forest site, and undisturbed evidence of the Coast Salish First Nations people, made this a special place for the fae.

Since the original settlers in the Lund area were Finns, ‘The Dome’ called for a Sauna. It just happened that Roisin and Phil had a cedar sauna in pieces, waiting to be used.

The bathhouse was built separately and the sauna found a home. The bunkhouse is also a new building.

Phil and Roisin invite you to experience for yourself the magic of “Sidhe Comhairle” at The Dome.

admin / December 2, 2009 / More Information

admin / December 2, 2009 / More Information

admin / December 2, 2009 / More Information